Water sources for the Future

over 2 years ago
CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Phase 2 of Tap In ‘Tell Us More’ is now complete. Phase 3 ‘Help us shape the future’ is coming soon.


  • Asterix over 2 years ago
    What would it cost to get deliver the forever solution of capturing the water from up north and piping it down south. It would change farming and residential development forever and mean that WA could capture the fresh water and use it.The WA climate enables great agriculture and wonderful living but the one limiting factor is water.Put a plan together and see what the overall benefits would be. Yes it would cost a few billion but it would bring about so many more opportunities for teh state.
    Hide Replies (2)
    • John H over 2 years ago
      The pipeline is a great idea. However, apart from the cost of building it, my understanding is that energy costs associated in pumping the water would mean the cost per kilolitre would be around $9. Desalination costs about $2.50 per kilolitre and is getting cheaper as technology improves.
    • valdarae over 2 years ago
      They could build a pipe line to Kalgoorlie in 1873 with the small population the state had then. So now that people are flocking to WA the North South pipeline would be easier to build. It could come directly Lake Argile to Kalgoorlie Then reverse the existing pipe flow to fill Mundaring weir. Water for the population and work for the population. It would be a turning point in our states economy.
  • Pauly over 2 years ago
    Domestic rainwater capture, greywater recycling, desalination, overland piping seem to be the sustainable water sources of the future. But the latter two have one big problem - the cost of energy. The former two could mitigate energy demand for the latter two, but I don't believe will ever eliminate it. That still leaves a large cost of operation for the latter two. Surely most of the ongoing operating cost is energy for pumping. This too can be mitigated, even eliminated, by use of renewables to supply energy for pumping. Its not ideal, since you can only pump while energy is available, unless you employ expensive energy storage. But do these sources really need to pump 24 x 7 now? These are long term solutions, so they should have a strategic design, which takes in to account current needs, capacity (water and energy) projections, future technology costs. In other words, can the infrastructure for these sources be designed to provide enough supply now, using only online renewables, and later augmented by future storage technology when it is both economical and necessary to meet demand?For the record, I am still unsure about greywater recycling for garden use. I am concerned that improper use could lead to environmental contamination. After all, the risk of contaminants entering grey water is very high.I agree with others comments about the benefits of big infrastructure projects. Benefits to the state make them worth revisiting. Alternative technology could make all the difference.
  • mudgeedog over 2 years ago
    1. I don't understand why we have normal rainfall and there is very little run-off into Canning dam.2. Why is the Wellington dam which is always full, not used as it is too salty? Is it ever going to be used?
    Hide Replies (3)
    • Admin Commented Customer Insights Team over 2 years ago
      Thanks for your question. Slowly declining rainfall means Perth's dams receive much less streamflow than in past years. We need steady, regular rain in order to soak our catchments and get water flowing into our dams. Due to our drying climate we can no longer rely on rainfall as a sustainable water source which is why, over the last ten years, we have invested to ensure there are more climate resilient water sources for the future of WA. Wellington Dam was decommissioned as a public drinking water source in 2013 due to its high salinity levels. It is currently fully allocated to irrigators, though many farmers have chosen not to irrigate with water from the Dam due to the potential risk of soil degradation. The dam is also open to public recreation. However there is a proposal to desalinate Wellington Dam for irrigation and drinking water, and the State Government have just provided funding for the next step in this project. Below is a link to the media statement from last week .https://www.mediastatements.wa.gov.au/Pages/McGowan/2017/07/Securing-fresh-water-supplies-for-growers-in-WAs-South-West.aspx RegardsThe Tap In TeamWater Corporation
      Hide Replies (2)
      • Gbol over 2 years ago
        Why isn't the water from Wellington Dam injected back into the underground aquifer using a method of filtration via the sub-soil rock layers to desalinate the water before if reaches down to the aquifer?
        Hide reply (1)
        • Admin Commented Customer Insights Team over 2 years ago
          A great question. Unfortunately water filtration through soil does not desaIinate water - if anything it mineralises it more. So although groundwater could be used for storage it cannot help with treatment of salty water.
  • emt over 2 years ago
    Desalination plants. I believe the Garden Island naval base is supplied with desalinated water from a small scale plant powered by wave energy. Is this something that can be considered for coastal communities?
    Hide Replies (3)
    • mudgeedog over 2 years ago
      Yes. Carnegie Wave Energy. They were also going to supply electricity and desal water to a number of overseas Islands but I am not sure where that is now. They have won a big contract in South Australia.
      Hide Replies (2)
      • redw over 2 years ago
        "They have won a big contract in South Australia" ... LOL, South Australia continues to be on the (b)leading edge of energy technology. Would be great though to have a low cost, widespread, reliable supply of water - the day will come.
        Hide reply (1)
        • mudgeedog over 2 years ago
          I have never had a problem with water or gone thirsty in Perth. The water problem is affecting agriculture mostly as rainfall is unpredictable.I see no need for water tanks in Perth. I was brought up on a farm with rain water tanks and underground storage. One needs to filter the water as it gets infected by mossies etc.Also, chloride has done wonders for the dental health of this generation.There is a cost problem for many in installing tanks and remember, 45% do not own a home, so are unlikely to invest in tanks, plumbing and filters.Like many ideas, nice but does not pass the practicality or cost test.
  • Josh over 2 years ago
    Why not promote or even subsidise the install of residential rain water tanks. Unless your unaware it (water) falls from the sky. There are many people currently responsible for their own water like myself and manage our water supply in accordance to the commitment to collect it (water).
    Hide reply (1)
    • Gbol over 2 years ago
      I agree, all houses in new developments could include water collection and filtration components in the house designs to effectively and safely collect rainwater runoff and ensure grey water is also recycled.